THE PLEIN AIR CONNECTION November 17th, 2014

THE PLEIN AIR CONNECTION November 17th, 2014


"Jordan Pond Stream, Acadia National Park, Maine" a watercolor 19 x 25 inches by Michael E. Vermette.

 

Museum Trip This Tuesday

 

This Tuesday  November 18th, the Plein Air Connection group will be going on a museum tour. We will be visiting the inspiring Colby College Art Museum in Waterville and the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland, Maine.We hope to explore the Bernard Langlais exhibit at the Lunder and the Colby College collection in Waterville beginning at 10 am.  We will then have lunch at the Colby College Dining Services food court.  We will leave Waterville for Rockland by 1:00 PM to the Farnsworth Museum by 2:30 PM where we will see four exhibits including The Wyeths, Maine and the Sea. If anyone would like to meet us there or car pool with us we are meeting at the Dysarts restaurant parking lot in Hampden at 9 am this Tuesday November 18th. If you are car pooling please remember to bring money for the driver you are riding with, museum fees and lunch money. We expect to be back in Bangor about 5:30 PM.   

 

 

The Harlow Gallery Show:

49 artists “Inspired by Katahdin”

Michael E. Vermette's painting on the left forground, image courtesy of HARLOW GALLERY.


  The opening that took place on Friday November 7th between 5-8 PM was a complete success. Many of our Plein Air Connect Group members where in this show. There was standing room only at the opening which made it difficult at times to actually see the work at a distance. It was truly inspirational as its title suggested and It enjoyed a lot of support from the 49 artists. friends and patrons who love Katahdin and Baxter State Park. The following is what is written about the show:


  Maine’s majestic Mount Katahdin is the muse for the 49 artists participating in “Inspired by Katahdin,” juried by brothersDavid and Carl Little, on view at the Harlow Gallery in Hallowell, November 7-29, 2014. An opening reception will take place Friday, November 7, 5:00-8:00 p.m. and is free and open to the public.  

The artists in the show come from all across the state and offer a wide range of motifs and mediums in their work. The exhibition was inspired by the acclaimed Art of Katahdin: The Mountain, the Range, the Region written by artist and author David Little and edited by Carl Little. Published by Down East Books in 2013, the book follows an historic timeline using art inspired by the mountain, as well as Katahdin-related literature, photography, graphics, maps and more.  The Littles will be signing copies of the book at the show’s opening reception.  

 

  Our next show that many of us are participating in is the PAPME ( Plein Air Painter's Of Maine) Show in Boothbay Harbor, the opening was last Friday at the Boothbay Region Arts Foundation and it ends November 24th. Artists in our group are also participating in the Member's Show at The Harlow Gallery, opening on November 18th.

 

Friends of Baxter Article

 

The Friends of Baxter wrote a follow up article of my experiences last summer with the Maine Youth Wilderness Leadership Program students. 


   
Harlow ArtCenter
November 11 at 11:03am
 

Michael Vermette on being inspired by Katahdin and teaching art. "Painting at Katahdin Lake with the Maine Youth Wilderness Leadership Program" via Friends of Baxter State Parklatest newsletter. 

Vermette is one of 49 artists participating in "Inspired by Katahdin" at the Harlow Gallery through Saturday, November 29.

 

To read the front page article click on the Link below:

http://www.friendsofbaxter.org/news/newsletters/FBSP_Fall_Newsletter_2014.pdf

 

 


 

FEAR and ART

the Next Book Discussion

 

Our next book discussion will be December 13th at the Peace and Justice Center between 10 and noon. The Book we have chosen to read is: ART AND FEAR, The Perils and Rewards of Artmaking by authors David Bayles and Ted Orland. 

 

 

Please read Chapters two to four before the next discussion.

 

Our Next Scheduled Paint-Out

 

Our next paint-out will be Saturday November 6th at or near Abol Campground along

the Golden Road, Baxter State Park. We will meet at the aubachon parking lot at Penobscot

Plaza by 8:00 am. Please bring a snowsuit and clothing warm enough to paint out in the cold.

We will not paint if it's raining or below 20 degrees. We will go out to a restaurant after before

returning home. Call me at 827-7573 if you are interested in joining us.


A Special 50 in 50 Painting Sale

I am committed to place 50 of my paintings on E-bay in 50 days in an affordable holiday sale between now and Christmas. So far I have posted 14 paintings and will put one painting up per day on E-bay's auction right up until the day before Christmas. They are all in the "Maine Paintings " section of E-bay's live on-line auction each for a duration of 7 to 10 days. Minimum bids begin as low as $150 for an 8 x 10 inch oil study to $225.00 for a 10 x 12 inch plein air painting. Here are just four that are now in the auction,

 

"After the Storm at Christmas Cove, Monhegan Island, Maine" an oil on gypsum gessoed oak panel 10 x 12 inches By Michael E. Vermette. If you would like to bid on this painting click HERE.

 


 

"Wild Strawberry Fields Atop the Headlands, Monhegan Island, Maine" an oil on gypsum gessoed oak panel 10x 12 inches By Michael E. Vermette. If you would like to bid on this painting click HERE.

 


"Swans Island Coast, Maine" an oil on gypsum gessoed oak panel 8 x 10 inches By Michael E. Vermette. If you would like to bid on this painting click HERE.

 



"Sunrise At Deer Isle, Maine" an oil on gypsum gessoed oak panel 8 x 10 inches by Michael E. Vermette. If you would like to bid on this painting click HERE.

 

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving Holiday everyone,

 

Michael E. Vermette

Coordinator of the Plein Air Connection

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THE PLEIN AIR CONNECTION November 16th, 2014


"Jordan Pond Stream, Acadia National Park, Maine" a watercolor 19 x 25 inches by Michael E. Vermette.

 

Museum Trip This Tuesday

 

This Tuesday  November 18th, the Plein Air Connection group will be going on a museum tour. We will be visiting the inspiring Colby College Art Museum in Waterville and the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland, Maine.We hope to explore the Bernard Langlais exhibit at the Lunder and the Colby College collection in Waterville beginning at 10 am.  We will then have lunch at the Colby College Dining Services food court.  Then we will travel to Rockland to the Farnsworth Museum by 1:00 PM where we will see four exhibits including The Wyeths, Maine and the Sea. If anyone would like to meet us there or car pool with us we are meeting at the Dysarts restaurant parking lot in Hampden at 9 am this Tuesday November 18th. If you are car pooling please remember to bring money for the driver you are riding with, museum fees and lunch money. We expect to be back in Bangor about 5 PM.   


 

The Harlow Gallery Show:

49 artists “Inspired by Katahdin”

49 artists “Inspired by Katahdin”

Cover image courtesy of Bill Bentley and David Little.


The opening that took place on Friday November 7th between 5-8 PM was a complete success. Many of our Plein Air Connect Group members where in this show. There was standing room only at the opening which made it difficult at times to actually see the work at a distance. It was truly inspirational as its title suggested and It enjoyed a lot of support from the 49 artists. friends and patrons who love Katahdin and Baxter State Park. The following is what is written about the show:


Maine’s majestic Mount Katahdin is the muse for the 49 artists participating in “Inspired by Katahdin,” juried by brothersDavid and Carl Little, on view at the Harlow Gallery in Hallowell, November 7-29, 2014. An opening reception will take place Friday, November 7, 5:00-8:00 p.m. and is free and open to the public.  

The artists in the show come from all across the state and offer a wide range of motifs and mediums in their work. The exhibition was inspired by the acclaimed Art of Katahdin: The Mountain, the Range, the Region written by artist and author David Little and edited by Carl Little. Published by Down East Books in 2013, the book follows an historic timeline using art inspired by the mountain, as well as Katahdin-related literature, photography, graphics, maps and more.  The Littles will be signing copies of the book at the show’s opening reception.  

 

Our next show that many of us are participating in is the PAPME ( Plein Air Painter's Of Maine) Show in Boothbay Harbor, the opening was last Friday at the Boothbay Region Arts Foundation and it ends November 24th. Artists in our group are also participating in the Member's Show at The Harlow Gallery, opening on November 18th.

 

Friends of Baxter Article

 

The Friends of Baxter wrote a follow up article of my experiences last summer with the Maine Youth Wilderness Leadership Program students. 


   
Harlow ArtCenter
November 11 at 11:03am
 

Michael Vermette on being inspired by Katahdin and teaching art. "Painting at Katahdin Lake with the Maine Youth Wilderness Leadership Program" via Friends of Baxter State Parklatest newsletter. 

Vermette is one of 49 artists participating in "Inspired by Katahdin" at the Harlow Gallery through Saturday, November 29.

 

To read the front page article click on the Link below:

http://www.friendsofbaxter.org/news/newsletters/FBSP_Fall_Newsletter_2014.pdf

 


 

FEAR and ART

the Next Book Discussion

 

Our next book discussion will be December 13th at the Peace and Justice Center between 10 and noon. The Book we have chosen to read is: ART AND FEAR, The Perils and Rewards of Artmaking by authors David Bayles and Ted Orland. 

 

 

Please read Chapters two to four before the next discussion.

 

Our Next Scheduled Paint-Out

 

Our next paint-out will be Saturday November 6th at or near Abol Campground along

the Golden Road, Baxter State Park. We will meet at the aubachon parking lot at Penobscot

Plaza by 8:00 am. Please bring a snowsuit and clothing warm enough to paint out in the cold.

We will not paint if it's raining or below 20 degrees. We will go out to a restaurant after before

returning home. Call me at 827-7573 if you are interested in joining us.


A Special 50 in 50 Painting Sale

I am committed to place 50 of my paintings on E-bay in 50 days in an affordable holiday sale between now and Christmas. So far I have posted 14 paintings and will put one painting up per day on E-bay's auction right up until the day before Christmas. They are all in the "Maine Paintings " section of E-bay's live on-line auction each for a duration of 7 to 10 days. Minimum bids begin as low as $150 for an 8 x 10 inch oil study to $225.00 for a 10 x 12 inch plein air painting. Here are just four that are now in the auction,

 

"After the Storm at Christmas Cove, Monhegan Island, Maine" an oil on gypsum gessoed oak panel 10 x 12 inches By Michael E. Vermette. If you would like to bid on this painting click HERE.

 


 

"Wild Strawberry Fields Atop the Headlands, Monhegan Island, Maine" an oil on gypsum gessoed oak panel 10x 12 inches By Michael E. Vermette. If you would like to bid on this painting click HERE.

 


"Swans Island Coast, Maine" an oil on gypsum gessoed oak panel 8 x 10 inches By Michael E. Vermette. If you would like to bid on this painting click HERE.

 



"Sunrise At Deer Isle, Maine" an oil on gypsum gessoed oak panel 8 x 10 inches by Michael E. Vermette. If you would like to bid on this painting click HERE.

 

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving Holiday everyone,

 

Michael E. Vermette

Coordinator of the Plein Air Connection

 


 


 

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50 in 50 Painting Sale: #5: Sunset From The NorthWest Shore of Swans Island, Maine.



 Sunset From The NorthWest Shore of Swans Island, Maine

an Oil on oak board 8 x 10 inches by Michael E. Vermette

 

  I drove to the NorthWest side of Swans Island and took a remote trail to the shore to set up my easel just as the sun was setting over an offshore island.  I liked how bright the sun was and how the light made the waters to each side of its reflection an emerald green. The wax medium I use gives an added luster to my paint colors which make them jewel like and it is a real pleasure to paint in response to the color of the light with this advantage. This painting was made within a one hour block of time which helps to capture the light and the freshness of the subject. I painted very directly with a bold value using only a small palette knife and even experimented with mixing an interference Mica color to my paints for the sun.  This painting glows like a stained glass window.

 

If you would like to bid on this painting on E-bay click HERE.

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50 in 50 Painting Sale: #4 Whitehead Cliffs at Sunrise, Monhegan Island, Maine


 

Whitehead Cliffs at Sunrise, Monhegan Island, Maine

an Oil on canvas 9 x 12 inches by Michael E. Vermette

 

  I painted this small oil on Monhegan Island last summer near the end of my one-week stay there in July. I ventured down from the Burnt Head Trail to the flat rock located nearer to the coast. Then I hiked with my gear over the huge rocks to get closer to Whitehead just before sunrise. The sun's rays casted a multi colored display of light reflecting off the clouds with the promise of blue sky peeking through. Whitehead's silhouette was promanate and was in complete shadow displaying amazing tones of cooler colors that got warmer as the rocks were closer to me. The tide was just going out and so the seas were fairly calm. I got Black Back and Herring gull visitors the two hours that I painted because I situated my easel near the gull pond. This small study has the feel of an amazing maritime morning and painted when the light is at its best.

 

If you would like to bid on this painting on E-bay click HERE.

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Painting No 3. The Carrying Place, Swans Island, Maine

50 in 50 Days: A Special Painting Sale on E-bay  

 

"The Carrying Place, Swans Island, Maine" an oil on oak Panel 8 x 10 inches by Michael E. Vermette.

 

Painting No 3. The Carrying Place, Swans Island, Maine

 

This last Spring I painted at a very special location called the Carrying Place on Swans Island, Maine. Swans Island basically looks like a butterfly silhouette from the sky and the Carrying Place is the site the two-winged land masses meet. There are two bays facing North East and South West both with spectacular views. I arose early at 5 am to paint this study facing North east toward Cadillac Mountain of Mount Desert Island. It has been said that the best place to view the mountains of Acadia is from an Island, and this has to be one of the most perfect views I've ever saw. The tide was out that morning and the water pockets trapped between mud flat furrows converged toward the rising sun of the cool yellowish light. 

 

My plan was to paint within a two-hour block of time and within that period the tide completely came in. This is why I painted the mud flat bay first. The other reason is that I usually paint the element that tends to be moving first and build the rest of the painting around that movement. The other reason why I love this place is that it  is the very place where my wife's ancestors, the Wabanaki people of Maine carried their canoes to reach better fishing grounds and not canoeing all around the island to get to the South East side of Swans Island. They simply portaged across this small section of land from one bay to another. One could also imagine that they rested here and would witness a view in early morning such as this.

 

If you would like to bid on this painting on E-bay please click HERE.

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THE PLEIN AIR CONNECTION November 1st, 2014: Choice or Chance?

THE PLEIN AIR CONNECTION November 1st, 2014: Choice or Chance?

 

"Katahdin From Kidney Pond" a watercolor 19 inches by 25 inches by Michael E. Vermette.

 

The Plein Air Connection Book Discussion

 

The Plein air Connection group met last Saturday at the Peace and Justice Center of Eastern Maine at 96 Harlow Street, Suite 100, Bangor, Maine. They have been very gracious to allow us to meet there for free. Kay Carter made her wonderful spicy Butternut Squash soup with everything organic to warm us. She also brought Tanbori Nan Indian flat bread and I brought a pumpkin spice role for desert to have with our tea. Thanks everyone who brought in the delicious food to share at our discussion!


Those present were Iver Lofving from Skowhegan, ME, Arrah Vanier from Hampden, ME,  Anne Spencer from Winterport, ME, Kay Carter from Hampden, ME and Myself from Indian Island, ME. 

 

We began our book discussion on National Author's Day with "Art and Fear" by David Bayles and Ted Orland between 10:00 am and noon. We began by discussing the idea of Choice vs. Chance in our work ethic as painters. We started with a quote by Stephen DeStaebler which begins the second chapter on page 14, 

 

" Artists don't get down to work until the pain of working is exceeded by the pain of not working."


 The idea of painting because it's to painful not to is sometimes a hard concept to get across to those who don't create on a regular basis. But it is a real emotion. For just about every artist, the most exciting work of art they are working on is the one they are presently wrestling with. And when we don't take the time to paint en plein

air or in our studios, those around us will notice that we are unhappy and even a little cranky. 


 This idea lead into a conversation of how art making can be viewed as a gift that we are born with and how we are completed when we are allowed to do it. But all of us, especially the art educator's present in the group including myself, agreed with the book that great art making involves skill that can be learned by anyone, even whom most people would consider common ordinary people. It is a matter of accepting ourselves making your work personal, and following one's own voice.


It is work to make art and for most of us, it takes years to perfect our chosen art form. But the encouraging thing is that while our art suggests humbly our flaws and weaknesses it also becomes our source of strength as we overcome obstacles. We brought the discussion deeper by sharing how art making is really all about the essential element of "uncertainty" as an all-pervasive companion to our desire to make it. In other words, we must all come to the realization that even our failed pieces are essential "X-rays" of what we tend to build our excellent art upon. Art making is a matter of doing, not a matter of talking about what we are about to do. 

 

We also have to be careful that we don't draw our identity from the vicious spiral that comes with making occasional flawed art or failures. All painters go through seasons of making ineffective art. It can make us feel like a flawed person that lead us to feel and say "what is the use!" We discussed how It is better to view ourselves as " creatives " who hold the potential of working in many different processes, directions and even media, rather than to get our identity directly from each art piece ending in success or disaster.

 

We all agreed that painted works that are not accepted or received favorably by the public can cause us to lose heart and focus on who we really are and how valuable we actually can be to our community. For example, the famous cave paintings of Lascaux that are over 200,000 years old and painted in many different styles over scores of generations by cro-magnon artists. Some of these paintings made by these Cro-magnon artists were 10 to 15 feet long with unbelievable color that has outlasted any paint we have available to us in today's technology, yet look as if they were painted the day before they were discovered.  Did these artists view themselves as individual painters creating for themselves or did they view their work as a functional part of their community's spiritual belief and life? The writer Henri Miller assorted after seeing these works for himself,

 

" I believe that Cro-magnon settled here [in the Dordogne region]  because he was extremely intelligent and had a highly developed sense of beauty." He went on to say, " I believe the religious sense was already highly developed and that it flourished here even if he lived like an animal in the depth of caves." 

 

 Do the artists of today concerned themselves with hunting for images and inspirations for their own gain rather than as spiritual seers who hold a valuable place in their community? But in truth, isn't that what we really are as painters?  We agreed that we were visual fore-seers of something much more beautiful than the self-seeking ambitious artists we can be made out to be by our world.  


Our discussion became even richer when we discussed how an artist accomplishes this connection with his or her community on a deeper spiritual level. Can our art make visible what most people don't see? I think it can. Could it move people emotionally and even become a spiritual connection to the Creator. I know it can, because I've see people moved by paintings emotionally. But what we have to work on is our personal relationship with the spirit. In fact, how we view ourselves as spirit inspired artists and value how we approach our easel as appointments with the spirit, will actually make all the difference between inspirational art and art made for art sake. And interesting enough there is something about how people who make art for themselves hold onto their art, gripping their art so tightly that it tends to slide back on them dragging them down. It was interesting to all of us how important it is to humbly release our body of previously made art work before approaching another with two hands on the present.  And to that end we finished our discussion with the first sonnet written by Kenneth Bolding of the 17th century Quaker martyr  by the name of Kenneth Naylor:

  

There is a spirit which I feel

Can I, imprisoned, body-bounded, touch

The starry robe of God, and from my soul

My tiny Part, reach forth to his great Whole

And spread my Little to the infinite Much,

When Truth forever slips from out my clutch,

And what I take indeed, I do but dole

In cupfuls from a rimless ocean-bowl

That holds a million million million such?

And yet, some Thing that moves among the stars,

And holds the cosmos in a web of law,

Moves too in me: a hunger, a quick thaw

Of soul that liquefies the ancient bars,

As I, a member of creation, sing

The burning oneness binding everything.

 

Fortunately we are not taken to the gallows for painting in the Art Spirit. We have a terrific freedom in this country to paint just as we like if we will only do it. We often take painting opportunities for granted. So the next time you take brush in hand, consider this; As ordinary as you think you might feel, you might actually be on this planet to co-create a beautiful painting that will be worked through your hands with the Spirit for those around you. And as hard as that is to believe or as humbling as it may seem to accept, as you show up to the easel, just know this; your artwork does make a difference to a visually starving world who just might need a touch of that beauty of the Art Spirit in your style and by your imperfect hand!

 

Be encouraged, and have an inspiring week of excellent painting!

 

Michael E. Vermette

Coordinator of the Plein Air Connection

 

Workshop Opportunity, There is still Space!

 

FROM STUDY TO FINISHED PAINTING

 

"Great Head in Early March, Acadia National Park, Maine" an oil on panel 12 x 16 inches by Michael E. Vermette

 

There is still room in my workshop for those who would like to take a two-day workshop this Saturday and Sunday, November 8th & 9th at the Centre St Gallery at 11 Central in Bath, Maine. The workshop is $175.00 per student. Please Click Here to read about more details and to aquire a complete list of materials or call 205-442-0300 if you are interested.


 

An Opening Reception This Friday for an important Katahdin Show!

 

"Moose Peeping At Sandy Stream Pond, Baxter State Park" an oil on extra rough linen 29 x 34 inches by Michael E. Vermette.


 

“Inspired by Katahdin”: 49​ Artists at the Harlow Gallery


Reception is Friday, November 7th, 2014


Hallowell, Maine – Maine’s majestic Mount Katahdin is the muse for the 49 artists participating in “Inspired by Katahdin,” juried by brothers David and Carl Little, on view at the Harlow Gallery in Hallowell, November 7-29, 2014. An opening reception will take place Friday, November 7, 5:00-8:00 p.m. and is free and open to the public.  

 

The artists in the show come from all across the state and offer a wide range of motifs and mediums in their work. The exhibition was inspired by the acclaimed Art of Katahdin: The Mountain, the Range, the Region  written by artist and author   David Little and edited by Carl Little. Published by Down East Books in 2013, the book follows an historic timeline using art inspired by the mountain, as well as Katahdin-related literature, photography, graphics, maps and more.  The Littles will be signing copies of the book at the show’s opening reception. 

 

"Inspired by Katahdin" is sponsored by Eaton Peabody Attorneys at Law of Augusta,Legacy Properties, Sotheby’s International Realty of Damariscotta, Macomber, Farr and Whitten of Augusta and by Cribstone Capital Management Financial of Augusta, and is supported by our Season Sponsors:  The Bank of Maine, Capitol Dental Care, Dead River Co., Great Gatherings, the City of Hallowell,  Mr. Brooks Harlow, Jr., the Jennings Family, Kennebec Savings Bank and the Vallee Brothers, Chris & Ray Vallee.

 

The Harlow Gallery, located at 160 Water Street in Hallowell, is open noon to 6:00 p.m., Wednesday–Saturday. For more information and a complete list of artists, visitwww.harlowgallery.org or call 207-622-3813 .


Participating artists by town are as follows:

 

Auburn: John R. Wiley

Bath: Michael Branca

Beals: Valerie Aponik

Belfast: David Estey and Clarence Hilyard

Biddeford: Rachael Eastman

Deer Isle: Frederica Marshall

Durham: Stephanie Berry

East Boothbay: Carlton Plummer

Eastbrook: Paul Alexandre John

Farmington: Alana Ranney

Gardiner: John Carnes and Janet Favor

Georgetown: Katherine Gray and Amy Peters Wood

Hallowell: Christopher Cart, Jym St. Pierre and the late Ellen Twisleton Vaughan , via the Vaughan Homestead Foundation

Hampden: Kay Carter

Hartland: Olena Babak

Hope: Bill Bentley 

Indian Island: Michael Vermette

Lincolnville: Stefan Pastuhov

Lubec: Tim Gaydos

Millinocket: Cat Clark and Marsha Donahue

Monmouth: Doris Anne Holman

Mount Desert Island: R. Scott Baltz and Judy Taylor

Mount Vernon: Pamela Hetherly

New Milford: Diane Dubreuil

New Portland: Nora West

New Sharon: Angie Blevins

Oakland: Abbot Meader

Orono: Teddi-Jann Covell

Pittston: Judith Schuppien

Portland: Douglas Howe

Readfield: J. Thomas R. Higgins

Searsport: Sandy Dolan

Sidney: Suzanne Savage Brewer

Surry: Nancy Hathaway

Topsham: Keith Spiro

Walpole: Erica Qualey

Washington: Joan Freiman

West Bath: Evelyn Dunphy

Westbrook: Caren-Marie Michel

Winthrop: Penny Markley and Kerry Wilkins-Deming

and from Webster, MA: John Redick and Pamela Redick

 

--

Harlow Gallery
Kennebec Valley Art Association
160 Water Street
Hallowell, ME 04347
207-622-3813 

Harlow Gallery online: www.harlowgallery.org

Facebook profile: www.facebook.com/theHarlow
Facebook page: www.facebook.com/harlowgallery

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HarlowGallery

Square: https://squareup.com/directory/harlow-gallery

Photo archives: picasaweb.google.com/harlowgallery

 


 

 Indian Island, November 2nd, 2014, photo taken by Michael E. Vermette.


A Special Holiday Sale on E-bay!


Well, winter is certainly on it's way and has come in like a lion! I had to take a ride out into the storm this morning with my lovely wife for coffe at Dunkin Donuts just to see the visual snow effects of the NorthEaster. I must confess that it got me into the spirit of the holiday season as I witnessed the snow falling on the white gold Birch leaves and crab apple trees. It was just so stunningly beautiful. And so I have decided to do something I have never done before. I will be putting 50 paintings on line to sell on E-bay in the next 50 days between now and December 24th.  All of them will be starting at an auction priced of $200.00 to $250.00 as an opening bid. They are mostly all oils that I have accumulated, small 8 x 10 inch, and medium 10 x 12 inch ones; some new and a few older ones. My first painting is ending on E-bay's live auction within the next two days. If you would like to take advantage of this special holiday sale please press  the words"PRESS HERE" below each photo posted in this newsletter or my Facebook postings. Happy Holidays!

 

"Blackhead From Squeaker Cove, Monhegan Island, Maine" an oil on solid oak board 10 x 12 inches by Michael E. Vermette. To view or bid on this painting please PRESS HERE.

 

Thank you for your wonderful comments!

 

I wish to thank all those who gave such gracious comments about our Plein Air Connect group newsletters and also my painting at Destiny Church in Bangor, Maine. Here are some of the comments and the video of me painting to the extrordanary song, "Your Masterpiece" sung by Ashmont Hill by Axiom Records http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=utf-8&fr=aaplw&p=Your+Masterpiece,+the+song.

 

"Your Masterpiece" an acrylic painting on canvas (provided by Bangor Canvas) 30 x 40 inches By Michael E. Vermette

Michael painted this painting during the Worship part of the service at Destiny Church. The photo taken by a remarkable photographer, David Patrick. If you would like to view the facebook video posted by pastor Brian Hurst click here. 

   
Brian Hurst
October 20 at 4:27pm
 

Okay.THIS right here! Wow! Michael Vermette absolutely did his thing Sunday! What a gift! He completed most of this work in a span of 6 minutes, then came back later in the service and put the finishing touches on it. He and his wife Elaine presented the finished work to Katey and I at the reception and it went up on a wall in my home Sunday night! Thank you so much!

 

Shirley Bland
3 days ago

 

Michael, 

 

I am so sorry I missed you when we were in Bar Harbor in August. You were busy with plein air days and I knew we couldn't meet, but I need to tell you how very much I enjoy your blogs! I just watched Chasing the Light and want to share it with my students. Keep on doing what you are doing and enjoy those beautiful sights. Your work is inspirational and lovely! Smiles, Shirley B.

 

 

 

 

 

We hope to eventually paint with everyone of you in due season. 

 

Have a great week everyone!

Michael E. Vermette

 

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THE PLEIN AIR CONNECTION October 15th, 2014 CHASING THE LIGHT

THE PLEIN AIR CONNECTION October 15th, 2014

CHASING THE LIGHT!

 

"Katahdin from the Natarswi Girl Scout Camp, Baxter State Park" a watercolor 19 x 25 inches by Michael E. Vermette.

 

Last Friday the Plein Air Connect group and myself painted in Baxter State Park hoping to capture the beautiful and spectacular color of the Fall foliage. We rented a house on Ambajejus Lake from good friends of mine. Each day we went into the park to paint en plein air. You might say we were "Chasing The Light" as we were lead by the spirit of beauty that was found their. We would gather every morning and discuss where we would go together to paint, but dispite our plans we would find some place where the light was amazing that would arrest us and make us stop to paint it. My good friend Michelle Mina sent me info on a video on U-tube that I recommend you all check out when you have 22 minutes to watch it. It is a film by Lee Groberg and Mark Goodman that includes multiple artists describing this very idea of spiritualy "Chasing The Light". It is refreshing for me to find so many testimonies of painting in the spirit and identifying with a painting having a life of its own.  Here is the Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCnkB3DscDs. I hope you enjoy it and are as encouraged as I was.  

 

Kay Carter and Becky Whight hiking the Elbow Pond trail in Baxter State Park. Photograph by Michael E.Vermette 

 

Upcoming Shows


For future showing opportunities PAPME or the Plein Air Painter's of Maine are having their third annual members show in November in Boothbay. It is open to everyone who has painted in plein air in Maine over the last year and you can enter up to two paintings. The drop off days are November 11th 9 am to 7 PM and November 12th 9 am to noon at the Boothbay Region Art Foundation. Most of our group will be participating and I would encourage you all to do so as well. This is a well attended event with good sale opportunities before the holidays.

 

The Next Paint-out and Book Discussion

 

Our next paint-out will be at Mount desert Island in Acadia National Park at Sand Beach on October 25th. The color will still be there and be sure to bring plenty of warm clothing layers. We will also stop at a restaurant on our way home for a group sharing of work. We will meet at the old Aubauchon Hardware in Penobscot Plaza by 8:30 am. 

 

Our next book discussion will be November 1st at the Peace and Justice Center between 10 and noon. The Book we have chosen to read is: ART AND FEAR, The Perils and Rewards of Artmaking by authors David Bayles and Ted Orland. 

 

 

 

Discussions will be lively and followed by a delecious soup make by Kay Carter and Becky Whight who will provide the bread for a luncheon after. Please bring your books or e-books on the discussion days and be prepared to discuss the introduction and chapters 1 & 2 by the first book discussion on that Saturday.

 

I will be teaching a workshop at the Centre Street Gallery in Bath, Maine called:

 

From Study to Finished Painting
All Media with Michael Vermette
Saturday & Sunday, Nov. 8 & 9, 9:30-4:30
$175
No Plein Air experience is suggested, this is a studio class not a plein air painting class.
* * * * * * *
Please visit the blog and view class pages for class details and materials lists:
 or call 205-442-0300.

 

My Holiday Exclusive Art Sale Begins this week!

 

I will be putting paintings on E-Bay each week from now through  December and alerting you to these auctions on E-bay. The paintings will each be up for 10 days in a live E-bay auction. They are small in size compare to my larger pieces and reasonably priced which make them perfect gifts for the Holidays.  If you would like to bid on my painting just press" Click Here" below and it will bring you right to the sight. 

 

"Blackhead From Squeaker Cove, Monhegan Island, Maine" an oil on oak panel 10 x 12 inches by Michael E. Vermette.

If you would like to check out this painting more closely and even make a bid Click Here.

 

 

Enjoy and keep chasing the light!

Michael E. Vermette

Coordinator of the Plein Air Connection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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THE PlEIN AIR CONNECTION October 7th, 2014

THE PlEIN AIR CONNECTION October 7th, 2014

 

"Katahdin at Chimney Pond" a watercolor 19 x 25 inches by Michael E. Vermette.

 

The Plein Air Connection had its first meeting on September 20th at the Peace and Justice Center of Eastern Maine at 120 Park Street in Bangor. There were five of us who attended and were present. Our main focus was on setting dates for meetings and featured paint-outs for October. We also decided upon a new book to read that will be our topic of our new upcoming book discussions. We decided to paint every other week and meet on the off week for a book discussion as before.

For more information and dates for paint-outs and discussions Click Here.

 

The Book we have chosen to read is: ART AND FEAR, The Perils and Rewards of Artmaking by authors David Bayles and Ted Orland.

 

 

 

Discussions will be lively and followed by a delecious soup make by Kay Carter and Becky Whight who will provide the bread for a luncheon after. Please bring your books or e-books on the discussion days and be prepared to discuss the introduction and chapters 1 & 2 by the first book discussion on Saturday November 1st between 10 am and noon.

 

The Painting Retreat on Ambajesus Lake in Millinocket, Maine.

 

The Plein Air Connect group will be having a painting retreat on Ambajejus Lake in Millinocket, Maine this weekend october 10th to October 12th. Our plan is to go into Baxter State Park each day and paint views of Katahdin in the fall foliage. The house we are staying at is full up. But if you would like to paint with us on any of these days please call me, Michael E. Vermette, leave a message before Friday October 10th and I will be happy to get back to you to help inform you of where we might be painting. 

 

As for those who are staying overnight at the painter's retreat house please call my wife Elaine at 207.827-7573 to coördinate food. All of us will be on our own for breakfast and lunch, but we will share a meal together at night. On Friday October 10th you are invited to paint in Baxter State Park at different times of the day. Then we will meet at the River Driver's restaurant at 7 PM where we have reservations. Please bring your wet oil paintings into the restaurant in a flat cardboard box or paint box or portfolio if they are watercolors or pastels. We will have a short group critique and discuss possible painting locations for the next few days. After, we will go over together to the painter's retreat house on Ambajejus Lake, which is a short distance from the restaurant, so that we can all settle in for the night. 

 

To learn more about the river Driver's Restaurant and how to get there in Millinocket, Maine Click Here.

 

The Benefit of Plein Air Festivals and Wet Paint Auctions: A Look Back at My Wet Paint Adventures and What I Learned. By Michael E. Vermette

 

Michael E. Vermette painting en plein air at Boathouse Cove in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

 

Paint For Preservation: Cape Elizabeth, Maine

 

July was the busiest schedule for those plein air artists who participated in wet paint auctions and festivals as I did. Beginning at Cape Elizabeth, Maine; the painters selected to "paint for preservation" at the Cape Elizabeth Land Trust had their best year ever! Kajiah Velex from Thomas Place Galleries and Auction House auctioned off paintings that reached into the 5,000.00 range to a sold out crowd. I also sold my painting to a very happy patron who won it in auction for more than last year's painting sold for. I remember that Cape Elizabeth for me was a second chance opportunity to paint Boathouse Cove and the unusual rock formations that reminded me of the petrified wood striations that I found in California as a boy. It's not petrified wood, more a shale rock, but just as interesting how the lines lead the eye into the sea. There was a middle-aged fisherman who came to cast his line from the head of the point and I included him in my painting composition to the left. I also included the tanker on the horizon because it resembled another off shore island in the distance and when you can repeat a shape it makes the painting more homogeneous. To continue reading Click Here.

 

May you all have a colorful and productive art-filled week,

 

Michael E. Vermette

Coordinator of the Plein Air Connection

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The Benefit of Plein Air Festivals and Wet Paint Auctions: A Look Back at My Wet Paint Adventures and What I Learned. By Michael E. Vermette

The Benefit of Plein Air Festivals and Wet Paint Auctions: A Look Back at My Wet Paint Adventures and What I Learned. By Michael E. Vermette

 

Michael E. Vermette painting en plein air at Boathouse Cove in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

 

Paint For Preservation: Cape Elizabeth, Maine

 

July was the busiest schedule for those plein air artists who participated in wet paint auctions and festivals as I did. Beginning at Cape Elizabeth, Maine; the painters selected to "paint for preservation" at the Cape Elizabeth Land Trust had their best year ever! Kajiah Velex from Thomas Place Galleries and Auction House auctioned off paintings that reached into the 5,000.00 range to a sold out crowd. I also sold my painting to a very happy patron who won it in auction for more than last year's painting sold for. I remember that Cape Elizabeth for me was a second chance opportunity to paint Boathouse Cove and the unusual rock formations that reminded me of the petrified wood striations that I found in California as a boy. It's not petrified wood, more a shale rock, but just as interesting how the lines lead the eye into the sea. There was a middle-aged fisherman who came to cast his line from the head of the point and I included him in my painting composition to the left. I also included the tanker on the horizon because it resembled another off shore island in the distance and when you can repeat a shape it makes the painting more homogeneous.

 

  I got a lot of visits from different tourist who seemed genuinely interested in my work, including a fellow participating artist, Alison Hill, who finished early. Me on the other hand, barely finished my on time and got it back to the auction tent by 3PM. It was the best live auction yet with a sold out crowd. I would love to do it again next year. 

 

  What I learned from this paint-out/auction is that preparation beforehand makes all the difference in the world. The week before, I was on Monhegan Island. Knowing I was going to paint a rocky coastal composition, I focused most of my 16 paintings that I produced on the island during my one week stay, on interesting coastal rock and ocean formations. By the time I reached Cape Elizabeth the very day after, I was exhausted but focused. Painting the larger oil at Boathouse Cove was more a reflex of what I had done all along. This can be a great painting strategy. I also would get into the habit of putting my work away in storage when I would complete them on Monhegan Island. This gave me a sense of starting fresh each time with both hands on the present and the real focus for painting was on the visual challenges at hand. It's very important that you paint in your own style and in the moment of expression when you take part in these kind of events.

 

 

Seventh Annual Wet Paint Auction and Raffle to benefit The Cape Elizabeth Land Trust" (CELT). CELT permanently conserves and provides stewardship for lands cherished in their community - from shore lands to marshes, from farmlands to woodlands - for the education, use and enjoyment of this and future generations. Photo by Sarah Beard Buckley- Faces Of Maine, Maine Magazine.

 

Paint The Penninsula: Blue Hill, Maine

 

The next wet paint-out that I participated in was the "Paint The Peninsula" fresh paint silent auction at the Blue Hill Library. It was

 held 4:30-7 p.m.  Saturday, July 21, at the Library. I was one of 60 artists that started out that day with two 11 x 14 inch blank painting panels and transform them into 2 interesting views the Blue Hill Peninsula. We all brought our paintings to the Library in the early afternoon by 1:00 PM or so and the library quickly transformed into a gigantic art gallery. The reception that took place later that evening featured refreshments and piano jazz player Scott Cleveland. The Winning bids were announced at the end of the evening and the works were taken home right away. The artwork that remained unsold stayed up for another month to give those artists another chance to sell. I sold both of my pieces and was among the highest bid at the silent auction. But this silent auction could not compare to the Cape Elizabeth Auction. But that was the point. When you participate in these wet paint festivals don't fall into the disappointing pitfall of comparing them against each other. They are all different and special opportunities in themselves with their own autonomy. I donated 50 percent of the sale of my work to the Blue Hill Public Library and ran into and met a lot of new and old friends.

 

 

 

Michael painting the sunrise in a blueberry field.  "Sunrise in the Blueberry Fields, Blue HillMaine" an oil 11 x 14 inches by Michael E. Vermette, photographed by my wife Elaine Vermette.

 

What I learned in this wet paint auction was how to listen to the spirit through my painter friend Kay Carter. She is a good painting friend of mine who had directed me late that day before to consider painting at a blueberry field located at the end of the peninsula. She told me how beautiful it was and that I should check it out. Not Knowing the area, my wife and I did just that. We ended up sleeping in our car overnight in that very blueberry field as we watched the moon rise over the mountains of Acadia. The moon rising over the blueberry field was a great painting idea in itself.  It is also how I discovered exactly where the sun would rise the next day so that I could set up to paint it at 5:15 am that next morning. It was very hot in the car that night and we couldn't open our windows because of the insects. So consequently, we got very little sleep as we tossed and turned all night. Kay Carter joined us that next morning as my wife went for coffee and sat in the car watching us fight off the black fly assault of the morning. And through the battle we both painted a beautiful pinkish sky with a rising fog bank that the sun eventually burned through. The colors were excellent at this time of the morning and  all I could think of was that I would have missed this opportunity if I hadn't taken the advice of my painter friend and checked the site out for myself the night before. On the other hand, she wouldn't have known where the sun would rise if I didn't sleep in that very field overnight. You have to know how you are going to paint a sunrise before it happens to capture it. Otherwise you will chase it as it quickly goes by. We finished at about 8 am. We could enter two paintings, so my second painting I made was of the Blue Hill Mountains from the golf course. Out of curiosity I did discovered this place by accident the day before as I took a side road from the main road. As a painter we must recognize, discern and listen to the voice of the spirit through our friends and even people that we meet. If we are honest there are many voices that shape us and influence what we do, and who we are, such as the words of our grandfather, a former art teacher, or in this case, a good friend. This fresh paint silent auction was a great way to prepare for the festivals to come in that it caused me to listen to those who had painted in Blue Hill before. It also gave a second chance for every participating artist to sell artwork in the later summer months through their follow-up art sale and show. 

 

The Castine Plein Air Festival: Castine, Maine.

 

The Castine Arts Association hosted a wonderful festival this year for all! They juried in 40 juried artists from around the northeast and Canada for a three-day plein air festival. The Weather started out with a down pour on first day, but conditions began to improve as skies cleared and artists enjoyed warm sunny days that would follow. Most of us painters attended the "Meet the Artists" social on Friday, July 25 and then went to paint after. It was well attended by artists and the festival committee members, sponsors and hosts, and provided a pleasant pause and refreshment opportunity for all before we finished the next day. Saturday's Reception, Award Ceremony and Sale drew large crowds and brisk sales of art. The award winners for 2014 were as follows: First Place, Philip Frey of Sullivan, ME; second place, Roberta Goschke of Waldoboro, ME, Third Place, Paul George of Ipswich, MA. Five Honorary Mention winners were Myself of Indian Island, ME, Suzanne Savage Brewer of Sidney, ME, Chrissy Pahucki of Pine Island, NY, Michael Chesley Johnson of Lubec, ME, and Chrissy Nickerson of Cape Rosier, ME, and Alberta Cananda. Congratulations to us all!

 

 

  Elaine and I stayed at a beautiful cottage apartment near the village that was owned by Janet and Verge Forbes out on Merry Mead Road in Castine . They were very accommodating and gracious hosts that made our stay very comfortable. This place had was in a beautiful location and provided a place to retreat to as my painting collection grew over the days. 

 

I learned to be led by the spirit in this festival. Others may call it," follow the beat of your own drum." Because there is so much that

can distract you in the words let drop by other artists and weather conditions.  You just need to listen to your heart and make choices. Things like, how you prepared for a festival like this; or if you were going to drink alcohol at the social; and do thick paintings ever really sell anyway?; can enter your mind that have nothing to do with being present to the festival. Sometimes the very weather became a obstical, although it is interesting that the best in show painting was painted during that very shift in the weather pattern.We all simply found places to paint and took advantage of places where we could live in the moment of our expressions. I'm happy to say that most of my impasto paintings did sell and I even received a special merit award for my painting, "The British Canal, Castine" an oil on panel 11 x 14 inches.

 

 

  

"The British Canal, Castine" an oil 11 x 14 inches by Michael E. Vermette  a special                        Michael painting at the British Canal in Castine, Maine.  merit winner at the Castine Plein Air Festival 2014. 

 

What I took away from this festival is the importance of being yourself, following your own convictions, and allowing yourself the freedom to be asocial. It is so important to go at your own pace and in your own style especially in a festival when there are so many painters working in the same place in so many different ways. Even though I had observed where other painters chose to set up on site, I simply never found the need to compare or look at their painting while working. My reason for this; even though I respect their unique style and work process, I don't want to be influenced by another artist. This is my moment when I make a huge draft on all my past painting experiences and in that moment of expression find myself completely engaged in visual problem solving. It is not a time to second guess myself or to ponder a lot of "What If's", as in "what if I use the same method as another painter?" Great painting for me always happens out of a need to respond to the subject in the moment based on what you know. There is little time to treat plein air painting in a festival as an opportunity to socialize or as an opportunity for study. This is a moment of expression. And although painting on location is a beautiful thing to watch other artists do, we need to realize that we are that painter. We can't be spectators and artist at the same time. We get to partake in that aesthetic expression ourselves. And because of that privilege I think we would be wise to choose which social events would help us produce great art, choosing carefully. A-socialism  is not Anti-socialism. It is being selective by putting the art process before the hype and boastful talk. I learned to let go of what people would say and how they acted, especially if it had very little to do with painting. After all we are not there to project an ora of fame around ourselves. We are there to paint and to become inspired by our subjects. That in itself is enough of a privilege in itself for me. Once you reach that confident peaceful place within yourself, the selling, the fame will take care of itself. 

 


Ninth Annual "Paint the Town" paint-out and fresh art auction at The Waldo Theatre 

The Bangor Plein Air Paint-Out and Auction, "Painting A Pathway to the Bog" at the Gracie Theater, Husson College.

 


 

          

Michael Vermette paint at the waldoboro Fresh Paint Plein                        " The Angelique in Camden Harbor" an oil  on canvas 18 x 24 inches

Air Paint-out and Auction 2014.                                                                    By Michael E. Vermette. (A painting that sold after the Waldoboro auction).


On August 2nd I participated in the Ninth Annual "Paint The Town" paint-out at the Waldo Theater with a preview and reception for the artists at 5 PM and an art auction 6 PM.  I also painted in the Bangor Plein Air Paint-out and Auction, "Painting A Pathway To The Bog" at the Gracie Theater at Husson College, with a reception, preview and live auction as well on August 16th. Both of these auctions were non-juried plein air events for the artists and were held at beautiful theaters with a live auctioneer. But curiously enough, both events lacked the buyers that these organizations expected. Most of the works were unsold throughout the night and oddly enough the live auctioneer at the Waldoboro Fresh Paint Art Auction did bid on the pieces herself trying to stimulate bids. This is never a good sign. By the end of the auction there were some paintings that sold but usually 1/2 to 1/4 of what they were worth, really no money at all. But it did give the painters at least two opportunities to sell art with a lot of extra considerations for the painters.

 

               

"Fly Fisherman on the Kenduskeag Stream"     " The Orono Bog Boardwalk at the Bangor City Forest"

an oil 16 x 20 inches on canvas by Michael E.                an oil 16 x 20 inches on canvas by Michael E. Vermette.

Vermette.        

 

Interesting enough, with both paint-outs I learned to never give up on a potential sale that could come after the auction is over. In both Auctions such as, I sold paintings through the auctioneer and the other paintings that did not sell I sold on the way out the door. The lesson is that even though prices are not announced by the auctioneer for paintings that are sold after the auction it could be, as in my case, that you could end up being the top-selling artist by a walk out sale by the end of the event. So I learned to look for these opportunities and how to take advantage of directly selling to a buyer after the auction. I believe no one can sell their artwork better the artist anyway, so I would watch for the people who spent time with my paintings and approached them confidently about the art. I would begin by introducing myself and allowed the conversation to grow from their. I realized that even though the paintings were selling for less there were still buyers who were also lingering and who were giving it another thought and possibly needed just a little nudge of encouragement by the artist who painted it. After all, the paintings were going for pennies on the dollar and if you didn't mind as an artist, it was a great opportunity to buy paintings. 

 

The Trails End Festival Plein Air Sale at the North Light Gallery in Millinocket, ME.

 

The Trails End Plein Air Festival took place in Millinocket through the North Light Gallery and was a four-day paint-out from Friday September 12th to Monday, September 14th. I was actually only able to take part on Friday afternoon and all day Saturday. Having to teach art classes at the Indian Island School, I actually didn't get to painting in the Baxter Region until 4 PM in the afternoon on Friday when most of the painters were returning. Directed by gallery owner and friend Marsha Donahue, I painted at Compass Pond just off the Golden Road for my first oil painting. This art sale also allowed multiple paintings that could go on display at the North Light Gallery.

 

      

"Katahdin From Compass Pond" an oil 16 x 20 inches by Michael E. Vermette.                                 Doubletop from Kidney Pond, a watercolor

        19 x 25 inches by Michael E. Vermette  CLICK HERE.

                                                                                                                                

 

The pond was unbelievable with lily pads in full bloom and great fall foliage reflecting from the mountain's rich autumn colors. The next morning I was able to walk with "the Artists of Katahdin" in the Parade carrying one of my paintings along with two others painters. Behind us two other painters carried our banner with the owner, Marsha Donahue. Next year we might throw out art supplies such as crayons to kids. And although it was the shortest parade I had ever participated in, I really enjoyed how well received the painters were by the local people. After the parade, all the painters went back out to paint. I went to Kidney Pond to paint a Lowery overcast view of DoubleTop. But what made it exciting for me was the bull moose that came out into the pond and stayed for over an hour.  Submerging his head down under the water to consume the plentiful water grass, he no doubt was enjoying the salad bar. I had to use a canoe to get to my location and enjoyed discovering the remoteness of this new location. In fact there were many new painting possibilities that I hope to return to later in October.

 

I learned the value of this festival and that when you take part in a festival like this, you need to be available. The advantage of talking and meeting with other painters of Katahdin in a gallery setting, having an opportunity to show with them and share the rich ideas that are  among the group are invaluable. That means you need to carve out time and set a priority for yourself to be present to the other artists and most of all your own painting on site. Next year the plein Air Festival might begin Thursday September 25th and I'll be ready this time because I hope to serve on the planning committee with Marsha and other painters. It promises to be one of the best Katahdin Plein Air Festivals ever! 

 

In closing I just want to say how these paint-outs, wet paint auctions, shows, sales and festivals were a lot of fun to participate in. They represented a lot of good causes that I was able to support through the sales of my work. This makes me proud that my art in a small way is changing our world for the better.  And next year if I have the opportunity to do it again, I will continue down this plein air painting trail with the insight that I will be more ready, allow myself to be led by the spirit more and listen to the spirit of truth through my painter friends. I will resolve to make myself more available by carving out time to fully take part, and never give up on the opportunity to sell my paintings to the right buyer no matter what the autonomy. Wet Paint/Fresh Paint opportunities not only give the artist a chance to support causes, but they also get you out into our beautiful state to discover beautiful areas that you may have never painted before. On the other hand, returning to the same place year after year is nice too because it will never be a matter of running out of subjects to paint for me. Because if painting is more about listening to the spirit and allowing yourself to be inspired by the landscape at the moment and less about finding new places to paint, then there will always be an endless supply of images to draw from in Maine for me. Fortunately, Maine has both!

 

I wish to thank all of those who made my painting on location in these events this summer so special. My wife and I are so blessed, grateful and enriched to have worked with you all.  We look forward to next summer with hopeful expectation towards new adventures.

 

All the best to you all,

 

Michael E. Vermette

Coordinator of the Plein Air Connection 

 

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MECA COLLECT FALL ART SALE 2014

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"Tying The Trawler Net, Bar Harbor" a watercolor on 300 lb press watercolor paper 19 x 25 inches by Michael E. Vermette

 

COLLECT: MECA's 2014 Fall Art Sale, featuring the work of MECA faculty, students, alumni, and others is coming soon.


Build your collection with a wide range of work in a variety of media by emerging and established artists, while supporting MECA's scholarship fund and over 200 participating artists.  


Michael E. Vermette, "Tying The Trawler Net, Bar Harbor "a watercolor on 300lb press watercolor paper,
19" x25", 2014.  Michael E. Vermette has taught classes through MECA's Continuing Studies program for over 16 years.

Preview more work on our Facebook Events Page.


INDUSTRY PREVIEW/SALE
WEDNESDAY
9am-3pm October 8
For Architects, Interior Designers, Store Buyers
By Appointment Only

INVITATIONAL PREVIEW/SALE
WEDNESDAY
6-9pm October 8
Reservations Required

SALE 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
10am-8pm October 9-11

ARTISTS RECEPTION
FRIDAY
6-8pm October 10

Free and open to the public.

For more information visit meca.edu/artsale or email artsale@meca.edu

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS:








 

MEDIA SPONSORS:


CONTRIBUTORS:

Petruccelli, Martin & Haddow, LLP

 

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